https://pbs.twimg.com/profile_images/3248612453/c61d2af3107419ecaf0431cb1deeef95_400x400.jpeg" >Rodway Hill Golf Club

Safeguarding & 

Child Protection Policy

Club Welfare Officer (CWO): Bob Clancy This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Deputy Club Welfare Officer (DCWO): Bob Preston 

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.


Rodway Hill Golf Club has considered its responsibilities to the children participating in club activities very carefully and has produced the following Safeguarding and Child Protection Policy and underpinning procedures in order to set out the standards we wish to uphold in providing activities for children and safeguarding the welfare of children in our care.

Rodway Hill Golf Club affiliates to England Golf Union (EGU).  The club recognises the policies of the Governing Body, as set out at www.childreningolf.org/about-us/roles-responsibilities.

Policy Statement

Rodway Hill Golf Club acknowledges its duty of care to safeguard the welfare of all children (defined as those under 18 years of age) involved in club activities.  All children have a right to protection, and have their particular needs taken into account.

Rodway Hill Golf Club will therefore endeavour to ensure the safety and protection of all children involved with the club through the Child Protection guidelines adopted by the Committee of the club.  It is the responsibility of all adults within the club to assist the Committee with this endeavour.

Policy Aims

  • To provide children with appropriate safety and protection whilst in the care of the club and also help them to enjoy their experience of the sport.
  • To reassure parents/carers that their children will receive the best practicable care possible whilst participating in club activities.
  • To provide support staff and volunteers to make informed and confident responses to specific child protection issues and to fulfil their role effectively.

Principles

  • The welfare of children is paramount.
  • All children, whatever their age, culture, disability, gender, language, ethnic origin and religious beliefs have the right to protection from abuse.
  • All suspicions and allegations of abuse and poor practice will be taken seriously and responded to swiftly and appropriately.
  • All staff and volunteers have a responsibility to report concerns to the nominated Club Welfare Officer or Deputy Club Welfare Officer.
  • Adults – staff, volunteers, coaches, referees and members will be supported to understand their role and responsibility with regard to the duty of care and protection of children and young people.
  • The club Committee will receive support through education and training to be aware of and understand best practice and how to manage any welfare or child protection issues that may come to light.

Rodway Hill Golf Club will work in partnership with parents/carers to review and implement child protection and welfare procedures.

Rodway Hill Golf Club’s policy and procedures are based on the above principles and UK and international legislation and government guidance and take the following into consideration:

  • The Children Act (1989 & 2004).
  • The Data Protection Act (1994 & 1998).
  • The Police Act (1997).
  • The Human Rights Act (1998).
  • The Protection of Children Act (1999).
  • Caring for the young and vulnerable – Home Office Guidance for preventing the abuse of trust (1999).
  • The Criminal and Court Services Act (2000).
  • What to do if you are worried a child is being abused (2005).
  • Working Together to Safeguard Children (2010).
  • The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child.
  • Any subsequent legislation relating to child protection would implicitly be incorporated into this document.

Responsibilities & Communication

The Rodway Hill Golf Club Safeguarding and Child Protection Policy will be available to all members, parents/carers, staff, volunteers and participants.

The Policy will be reviewed every three years by the Committee, and amended as appropriate. 

The Committee has responsibility for ensuring that the policy and procedures are implemented, including taking any disciplinary action necessary.

The Club Welfare Officer has responsibility for the responding to any allegations, concerns or child protection incidents, passing information to the NGB Child Protection Officer and informing the appropriate club staff.

Parents/Carers have a responsibility to work together with the club in implementing procedures and providing their children with the necessary information to safeguard themselves.

Dealing with Concerns

It is not the responsibility of those working in golf to decide whether or not child abuse is occurring.  It is however their responsibility to act on concerns about inappropriate behaviour, abuse or bullying.

All information received and discussed must be treated as confidential and only shared with those who will be able to manage and resolve the situation. On occasion it may be necessary to seek advice from the NGB Lead Child Protection Officer (NGB CPO), or inform statutory agencies such as Child Social Care (CSC) or the police. 

Concerns should be dealt with using the procedures outlined on the following pages.  

Safeguarding Children

Physical Abuse:

A form of abuse which may involve hitting, shaking, throwing, poisoning, burning or scalding, drowning, suffocating or otherwise causing physical harm to a child.  Physical harm may also be caused when a parent or carer fabricates the symptoms of, or deliberately induces, illness in a child.

            Signs and Signals

  • Fractures
  • Cigarette burns
  • Human bites
  • Bruised eyes
  • Fingertip bruising
  • Burns and scald marks
  • Bruising in sites not easily injured
  • Frequent “accidents”
  • Unusual cuts or marks
  • Parents/carers not leaving the side of an injured child
  • Frozen watchfulness
  • Aggressive play/conduct problems
  • Preoccupation with own body and health
  • Account of injuries inconsistent with their appearance
  • Unusual degree of parental/carer hostility
  • Unusual lack of parental/carer concern
  • Different accounts of events
  • Injuries and different stages of healing
  • Unexplained injuries
  • Reluctance to undress/participate in sport.

Neglect:

The persistent failure to meet a child’s basic physical and psychological needs, likely to result in serious impairment of the child’s health or development.  Neglect may involve a parent or carer failing to: provide adequate food, clothing and shelter (including exclusion from home or abandonment); protect a child from physical and emotional harm or danger; ensure adequate supervision (including the use of inadequate care-givers); or ensure access to appropriate medical care or treatment.  It may also include neglect of; or unresponsiveness to, a child’s basic emotional needs.

            

Signs and Signals

  • Growth failure
  • Developmental delay
  • Excessive hunger
  • Inadequate clothing
  • Very poor condition – skin, hair, nails and general physical appearance
  • Poor hygiene
  • Marked drop in weight/height centiles without reason
  • Tired and apathetic presentation
  • Poor activity attendance without reason
  • Inability to play – due to lack of stimulation
  • Parent/carer with mental health/drug/alcohol problems
  • Untreated illness or injury
  • Evidence of failure to protect a child from exposure to any kind of danger
  • Withdrawn
  • Food scavenging
  • Poor achievement

Emotional Abuse:

The persistent emotional maltreatment of a child such as to cause severe and adverse effects on the child’s emotional development.  It may involve conveying to a child that they are worthless or unloved, inadequate or valued only insofar as they meet the needs of another person.  It may include not giving the child opportunities to express their views, deliberately silencing them or ‘making fun’ of what they say or how they communicate.

It may feature age or developmentally inappropriate expectations being imposed on children.  These may include interactions that are beyond a child’s developmental capability as well as overprotection and limitation of exploration and learning, or preventing the child participating in normal social interaction.  IT may involve seeing or hearing the ill-treatment of another.  It may involve serious bullying (including cyberbullying), causing children to frequently to feel frightened or in danger, or the exploitation or corruption of children.

            Signs and Signals

  • Emotional rejection of the child
  • Scapegoating of child by family members
  • Child subjected to constant blaming/criticism or ridicule
  • Child racially abused by family members
  • Breakdown of parental relationship with chronic, bitter conflict over contact/residences
  • Major and repeated family changes (separations, etc.)
  • Domestic violence
  • Child is responsible for caring for other children/parents
  • Addiction to drugs and alcohol or involvement in seriously deviant lifestyles
  • Bizarre parental beliefs
  • Serious physical or psychiatric illness of parent
  • Fear, anxiety, depression, despair
  • Extreme lack of self esteem
  • Poor achievement and concentration
  • Over-compliant and passive behaviour
  • Dominating and controlling behaviour
  • Poor relationships

Sexual Abuse:

Sexual abuse involves forcing or enticing a child or young person to take part in sexual activities, not necessarily involving a high level of violence, whether or not the child is aware of what is happening.  The activities may involve physical contact including assault by penetration (for example rape or oral sex) or non-penetrative acts such as masturbation, kissing, rubbing and touching outside of clothing.  They may also include non-contact activities such as involving children in looking at or in the production of, sexual images, watching sexual activities, encouraging children to behave in sexually inappropriate ways, or grooming a child in preparation for abuse (including via the internet).  Sexual abuse is not solely perpetrated by adult males.  Women can also commit acts of sexual abuse, as can other children.

            Signs and Signals

  • Pregnancy – especially where the father is unknown
  • Semen in vagina, anus or external genitalia
  • Bruising, scratching or other injuries to genital or anal areas, or other “sexual” areas such as breasts, lips, etc.
  • Sexually transmitted infections/diseases
  • Anal warts
  • Urinary tract infections
  • Soreness/itching or pain on toileting
  • Recurrent abdominal pain, headaches or other
  • Psychosomatic features
  • A child who hints at sexual activity/uncomfortable secrets
  • Inappropriate sexual behaviour to other children or adults
  • Preoccupation with sex
  • Inappropriate and repeated sexual play talk/drawings
  • Running away
  • A child avoiding certain people/situations
  • Severe eating disorders in older children
  • Self-harming behaviour

Further information on Child Sexual Exploitation and Female Genital Mutilation

Child sexual exploitation (CSE) involves exploitative situations, contexts and relationships where young people receive something (for example food, accommodation, drugs, alcohol, gifts, money or in some cases simply affection) as a result of engaging in sexual activities.  Sexual exploitation can take many forms, ranging from the seemingly ‘consensual’ relationship where sex is exchanged for affection or gifts, to serious organised crime by gangs and groups.  What marks out exploitation is an imbalance of power in the relationship. The perpetrator always holds some kind of power over the victim which increases as the exploitative relationship develops.  Sexual exploitation involves carrying degrees of coercion, intimidation or enticement, including unwanted pressure from pees to have sex, sexual bullying including cyberbullying and grooming.  However it is also important to recognise that some young people who are being sexually exploited do not exhibit any external signs of this abuse.

Female Genital Mutilation (FGM): professionals in all agencies and groups in relevant communities, need to be alert to the possibility of a girl being at risk of FGM, or already having suffered FGM.  There is a range of potential indicators that a child or young person may be at risk of FGM, which individually may not indicate risk but if there are two or more indicators present this could signal a risk to the child or young person.  Victims of FGM are likely to come from a community that is known to practise FGM. Professionals should note that girls at risk of FGM may not yet be aware of the practice or that it may be conducted on them, so sensitivity should always be shown when approaching the subject.

Listen to the Child

Children who report to a member, staff, volunteer or participant that someone has abused them must by listened to and heard, whatever form the communication may take.

The following points give guidance on how to deal with a child who makes an allegation:

  • Listen to the child, but do not conduct an interview or ask the child to repeat the account.  Avoid asking questions and make sure that any questions asked are open-ended (i.e. not inviting yes or no as an answer).
  • Do not interrupt when the child is recalling significant events.
  • Make a careful note of all information, including details such as timing, setting, who was present and what was said, in the child’s own words.  The account should be obtained verbatim or as near as possible.  Always record what was said as contemporaneously as possible. Notes written up afterwards will carry less weight than those made at the time.
  • Take care not to make assumptions about what the child is saying or to make interpretations.
  • On no account should you make suggestions to the child as to an alternative explanation for their worries.
  • The written record of the allegations should be signed and dated by the person who received them as soon as is practicable.
  • All actions subsequently taken should be recorded.
  • The Disclosure should be reported to the CWO as soon as possible.
  • No member, staff, volunteer or participant should promise confidentiality to a child who makes an allegation.  The member, staff, volunteer or participant should make it clear to any child asking confidentiality that he or she will need to pass on what has been told, to ensure the protection of the child concerned. Within that context, the child should then be assured that the matter will be disclosed only to people who need to know, and the child will know who these people are.

Take Action

The member, staff, volunteer or participant who has listened to the allegations of abuse should report immediately to the CWO, who will pass information to the NGB Lead Child Protection Officer as outlined above.  If the CWO is the person against whom the allegation is made, the member, staff, volunteer or participant should report to the DCWO or a member of the Committee.  The support needs of a child who expresses concerns about significant harm should be considered and met, utilising resources within or beyond the club as necessary.

Specific Issues

Any questions or requests for further information regarding any of the issues discussed in this document should be directed to the CWO/DCWO.

HOW DO I GET A HANDICAP?

How do I get a handicap and maintain it?

To get a golf handicap that will then be recognised at any course, you need to submit score cards for 54 holes (3 lots of eighteen, or a mixture of nine/s and eighteen/s) signed by yourself and by the person recording the score (the marker, who must him or herself have a valid handicap) by placing them in the box immediately inside the door to the club shop.  You can also get these scores by playing in any of the singles medal or stableford competitions listed below.

Alternatively, you can submit a SUPPLEMENTARY SCORE. To do this, you need to sign on the sheet in the folder that is kept behind the desk in the clubhouse, BEFORE you play the round and then place the scorecard in the box (You cannot have a particularly good or bad round and then say ‘I think I’ll submit that for my handicap’).  You can do this over 9 or 18 holes.  You do need to indicate on the card which tees you have played off – for men, this is usually yellow. While we encourage players to submit supplementary scores to ensure thay maintain a handicap, there is some guidance from England Golf about them, as follows:

Although golf club committees and administrators may consider that in the course of a playing season they organise an adequate number of competitions to provide ample opportunity for Members to participate, investigation has confirmed that a substantial number of Members do not return sufficient scores in the period between Annual Reviews to maintain a handicap that reasonably reflects their current ability.

This may in part be due to:

  • Work or family commitments preventing participation in competitions;
  • Difficulty in obtaining an acceptable starting time on competition days in clubs with a large playing membership; or
  • A declining desire to play regular competitive golf.

Supplementary rounds are not therefore seen by England Golf as a way ofplayers working to reduce (or increase) their handicaps when they are able to play in regular club competitions. Clause 21 further stipulates that the maximum number of such rounds anyone can play in a year is ten, and that a player cannot submit two supplementary rounds in a week.

On any scorecard you hand in, you only have to show your gross score – your actual number of shots – at each hole.  The handicap secretary and Handicap Master (the national computer programme for golf handicaps) will do the rest.

To keep a handicap and thus to be able to play in competitions, you have to submit a minimum of three ‘qualifying’ scorecards in 12 months; if you don’t, your handicap will lapse and you will have to play another 54 holes, as above.

The Club Committee undertakes an annual review of handicaps, usually in December of each year.  With information from the computer about each player’s performance over the year, together with knowledge of how players have been performing in other situations, the Committee can make a judgement to raise or lower a handicap so that it is a proper reflection of a player’s ability.

GENERAL TERMS OF COMPETITION

It is the responsibility of members to know and follow these General Terms of Competition, as well as any Specific Terms of Competition that apply to the various competitions staged by the Club.

1. ELIGIBILTY

Age Limits

Mens and Ladies competitions have no age limitations.

Senior Mens competitions are open to all males members who are 55 years of age or older. A player must be 55 on or before the first day of competition,

Handicap Limits

For competitions played over multiple rounds, during which a player’s handicap may change, players shall use their revised handicaps unless otherwise specified in Specific Terms of the Competition.

Club handicaps i.e. 29 and over for men and 37 and over for ladies, are allowed in competition unless otherwise specified in Specific Terms of the Competition.

The following handicap allowances are to be used when playing Four – ball

Match Play

Back marker to concede strokes to the other 3 players based on 90% of the difference between the full playing handicaps.

Stroke Play / Stableford

Each partner receives 90% of full playing handicap

Membership and Handicap Status

Entry to competitions is limited to members of the Club (unless the Specific Terms of Competition specify it to be an Open competition) with a current handicap.

2. ENTRY REQUIREMENTS AND DATES

In order to enter a competition, members must enter their names on the appropriate Competition Sheet, which will be found on the main notice boards  (Men, Seniors, Ladies)

Entries will be accepted up to and including the Closing Date, which will be stipulated on the Competition Sheet.

Late entries may be accepted at the discretion of the Committee, but this will be dependent on the Course having starting times available or the withdrawal of players already included in the draw.

In Fourball competitions, played over multiple rounds, the substitution of players is not allowed once a pair has played their first round or match.

When players are required to arrange their own times e.g. for knockout competitions, it is the responsibility of the first named player/team on the Match Draw Sheet to arrange the match with their opponent/s.

When doing so, a minimum of 3 dates/times must be offered for negotiation and these shall include a mid-week date, a weekend date and the final play by date for that round. It is recommended that these dates and any negotiation thereof, be communicated by e-mail or other easily recorded messaging system.

Should an agreed match not take place, or should no agreement be reached to play by a set play by date, then both sides will be disqualified, unless it can be clearly determined that one side defaulted.

Entry fees of £3.00, (£6.00 For the Club Championship) must be paid prior to the commencement of any competition by either handing the fee to a nominated Committee Member or by placing the fee in a sealed envelope, showing the members name and competition entered, in the box provided. In the case of mid-week medals and stablefords, the entry fee must be paid to Club Staff in the shop.

3. WITHDRAWAL FROM A COMPETITION

Should a player need to withdraw from a competition after the draw has been done, the player must contact the Chairman of the Handicap and Competitions Committee, by text, email or telephone as soon as possible. 

Failure to do so will result in sanctions being applied, in terms of the Code of Conduct.

4. FORMAT INCLUDING HANDICAP ALLOWANCE

Information on the following points is given in the Specific Terms of the Competition.

  • Dates of play or, if it is a Match Play event over an extended period of time, the final date by which each round must be completed.
  • Form of play i.e. Match Play, Stroke Play or Stroke Play going into Match Play.
  • Number of rounds
  • If there is a cut, when it will be made, if ties for the final position will be broken, and how many players will continue in later rounds
  • Which Teeing Areas will be used

5. TERMS FOR OTHER FORMS OF PLAY

Unless otherwise specified in the Specific Terms of Competition, other forms of Play including Stableford and Par/Bogey shall be played in accordance with Section 5A of the Committee Procedures contained in the official Guide To The Rules Of Golf.  Greensomes and Scrambles are covered by Sections 9B and 9C respectively.

6. WHEN SCORECARD HAS BEEN RETURNED

A scorecard is deemed to have been returned when it has either, been handed to the Committee Member running the Competition, or has been put into the box provided. 

Players are requested to enter their scores into the Computer System, where applicable, prior to returning their cards (sanctions may be applied to members who repeatedly fail to comply with this request, in terms of the Code of Conduct).

7. HOW TIES WILL BE DECIDED

Match Play

If a match is tied after the 18thhole the match will be extended one hole at a time until there is a winner.

Stroke Play

Unless a play-off is stipulated in the Specific Terms of Competition, all ties will be decided by matching scorecards.

In Competitions played over multiple rounds, the winner will be based on the best score for the last round played.  If the tying players have the same score for the last round, or if the competition consisted of a single round, the winner will be determined based on the score for the last 9 holes, last 6 holes, last 3 holes, and finally the 18thhole.  If there is still a tie, the last 6 holes, 3 holes, and final hole of the first 9 holes will be considered in turn.

If this process does not result in a winner, the outcome will be decided by tossing a coin.

8.  WHEN THE RESULT OF THE COMPETITION IS FINAL

Match Play

The result of a match is final when the result has been recorded on the Match Draw Sheet on the appropriate noticeboard (Mens, Seniors, Ladies noticeboards).

Stroke Play

The Competition is closed and the results are final once all results have been posted on the appropriate noticeboards (Mens, Seniors, Ladies noticeboards).

 

SPECIFIC TERMS OF COMPETITION (MEN)

 

Monthly Medals and Stablefords

Played on the second Saturday of each month.

From April to September the competition is played as a medal off the white tees and from October to March as a Stableford off the yellow tees.

The competitions from November to February are non-qualifiers.

The field is divided into divisions by handicap and there must be a minimum of five players entered for the competition to take place.

 

     Public Courses Monthly Medal (April)

By paying an additional entry fee on the day of the competition, entrants in the April Monthly Medal are entered into the Public Courses Medal.

The field is divided into divisions as set by the N.A.P.G.C.

Divisional winners qualify to play in the N.A.P.G.C. regional competition, with regional winners progressing to a national final played in September at St Andrews.

 

Gold Medal (May)

The Gold Medal competition is run concurrently with the May Monthly Medal.

By paying an additional entry fee before commencement of play, the winner of the competition qualifies to play in the County Medal Final at a prestigious course in the County.

 

Monthly mid-week Medals and Stablefords

Played on the Wednesday following the Monthly Medals / Stablefords.

From April to September the competition is played as a medal off the white tees and from October to March as a Stableford off the yellow tees.

The competitions from November to February are non-qualifiers.

There must be a minimum of five players entered for the competition to take place.

The competition can be played at any time on the day with a minimum of two players playing together.

 

Prizes for the monthly and mid-week medals take the form of vouchers that are redeemable at the Club shop, together with a single medal for each overall monthly competition, presented at the presentation evening in October.  The number and value of the vouchers is determined by the number of entrants in the respective divisions – the more entries, the higher the value of the vouchers. The vouchers are made available for spending shortly after each competition.

The winner of the August monthly medal is recognised as the winner of the Sheila Press award, and has his name engraved on the trophy and on the Club honours board.

 

Shoot Out

Played on a Saturday early in October.

All male members who have won an overall Monthly Medal and/or the Club or Seniors Championship during the year qualify for the Shoot-Out.

The Competition is a medal played off the white tees.

The winner is the player with the lowest net score.

The winner of the Shoot-Out has his name engraved on the perpetual trophy, as well as receiving a trophy and/or voucher prize on Presentation Evening.

 

Monthly Medal Best Net Score

This trophy is awarded to the player achieving the best net score out of all the Monthly Medal competitions held over the year.

No specific entry is required – all winning scores in Monthly Medals will be taken into account.

The winner of this prize, the Aggregate Shield, has his name engraved on the perpetual trophy and the Club honours board, as well as receiving a trophy and/or voucher prize on Presentation Evening.

 

The following are the annual Club competitions organised by the men’s section.  In all cases, the value of the prizes awarded reflects the number of entrants to the competition, the prestige of the competition and the number of matches or rounds required to win it.

 

Memorial Day

A Four-ball Stableford competition played over 18 holes off the yellow tees (mats) on a Saturday in mid –March.

The winners of the Memorial Day competition have their name engraved on the perpetual trophy, known as the Gwyn Morris, and the Club honours board, as well as receiving a trophy and/or voucher prize on Presentation Evening. The runners-up also receive a trophy and/or voucher prize.

 

Spring Foursomes

A Foursomes Stableford competition, played over 18 holes, off the white tees (if available) and yellow tees (mats) if not.

The winners of the Spring Foursomes competition have their name engraved on the perpetual trophy and the Club honours board, as well as receiving a trophy and/or voucher prize on Presentation Evening. The runners-up also receive a trophy and/or voucher prize.

 

Founders Trophy and Plate

An Individual, knock-out, Match-Play competition, played over 18 holes (which will be extended if necessary to decide a winner), played off the white tees.

The maximum handicap allowed is 28.

Losers in the first round are automatically entered into the plate competition.

The first round is played on the first Saturday in May. The draw for the first round will be a random draw done in accordance with the Official Guide to the Rules of Golf, Committee Procedures Part lll Section 5F.

Subsequent rounds are played by mutual arrangement on or before laid down “play by” dates, and cannot be played in conjunction with another competition.

The winners of the Founders Trophy and Founders Plate have their name engraved on the perpetual trophies and the Club honours board, as well as receiving a trophy and/or voucher prize on Presentation Evening. The runners-up also receive a trophy and/or voucher prize.

 

Summer Pairs

A Greensomes, knockout Match-Play competition, played over 18 holes (extended to decide a winner).

The competition is open to all men, senior and lady members entered as a pair.

Handicaps are calculated as 0.6 of the lower player’s handicap plus 0.4 of the higher player’s.

Men play off the white tees and ladies play off the red tees.

A random draw (see above) is made for the first round. This and subsequent rounds are played by mutual arrangement on or before laid down “play by” dates.

The winners of the Summer Pairs have their name engraved on the perpetual trophy as well as receiving a trophy and/or voucher prize on Presentation Evening. The runners-up also receive a trophy and/or voucher prize.

 

Longest Day

Played on the Saturday nearest to the longest day of the year.

This is a Texas Scramble played by teams of three players.

The team handicap is calculated as 0.1 of the combined handicaps of the three players.

A minimum of four tee shots of each team member must be used during the round.

The winners of the Longest Day competition receive a trophy and/or voucher prize on Presentation Evening. The runners-up also receive a trophy and/or voucher prize.

 

Nimar Trophy

Played on a Saturday at the end of June.

This is an Individual Stableford competition played over 18 holes off the white tees.

The maximum handicap allowed is 28.

The overall winner of the Nimar Trophy has his name engraved on the perpetual trophy and on the Club honours board as well as receiving a trophy and/or voucher prize on Presentation Evening. The competition is played in three divisions, and there are also trophies and/or vouchers for the Divisional Winners and runners-up.

 

Jim Brady Cup

Played on a Saturday at the end of July.

This competition is open to men and ladies.

It is an 18 hole Aggregate Pairs, Stableford competition, with men playing off the white tees and ladies off the red tees.

The winners of the Jim Brady Cup have their name engraved on the perpetual trophy as well as receiving a trophy and/or voucher prize on Presentation Evening. The runners-up also receive a trophy and/or voucher prize.

 

Presidents Day

Played on the first Saturday of August

This is a non-qualifying competition, played off 90% of playing handicap and is open to men and ladies. The men’s competition is played in two divisions.

It is an 18 hole Individual Stableford competition with men playing off the white tees and ladies off the red tees.

The winners of the Men’s and Ladies’ Presidents Cups have their names engraved on the perpetual trophies and the Club honours boards as well as receiving trophies and/or voucher prizes on Presentation Evening. The other Divisional winner and the runners-up also receive a trophy and/or voucher prize.

 

Captains Day

Played on a date chosen by the Captain, usually in August.

The Captain will choose the format and conditions of the competition, and prizes are presented on the day.

 

Club Championship

Played on two successive weekend days in mid-summer.

This is a 36 hole Individual Stroke-Play competition played over two rounds of 18 holes. The winner is the player who achieves the lowest total gross score over the 36 holes.

The first round draw is done in handicap order with the highest handicap starting first. The second round draw is done based on the gross scores from the first round and is done in score order with the highest score starting first. The handicap used at the start of the competition is used for both rounds.

In the event of a tie (for the overall first place only) there will be a playoff to decide the winner.

The playoff will take place as soon as possible after completion of the second round.

The playoff will be Individual Stroke-play over hole numbers 10, 17 and 18. If, after completion of the three holes, there is still a tie, a sudden death playoff will commence with the 18th hole being played repeatedly until a winner emerges.

The following prizes are awarded:

The Club Champion, who has the lowest gross score, has his name engraved on the perpetual trophy and the Club honours board, as well as receiving a trophy and/or vouchers at Presentation evening. There are also trophies and/or vouchers for the players with the second and third best gross scores.

The winner of the net competition who will have achieved the best net score over the two rounds receives the net prize, known as the NS Pyramids Rabbits Plate.  He has his name engraved on the perpetual trophy and the Club honours board, as well as receiving a trophy and/or vouchers at Presentation evening.  There is also a trophy and/or vouchers for the net runner-up.

The competition also has a Seniors’ section. Those wishing to enter the Seniors’ section are required to do so before the start of the first round.  The winner of the Seniors’ section will be the Senior with the best net score over the two rounds. He has his name engraved on the perpetual trophy and the Club honours board, as well as receiving a trophy and/or vouchers at Presentation evening.  There is also a trophy and/or vouchers for the Seniors runner-up.

 

Winter League

This is a Four-ball, Stroke-Play going into Match-Play competition.

The Stroke-Play element consists of four 18 hole rounds of Four-ball Stableford, played over four week-ends from October to November. If there are between 8 and 15 pairs, the eight pairs with the highest total score from the best three of their five rounds progress to the Match-Play competition. If there are 16 or more pairs, then the sixteen pairs with the highest total score from the best three of their five rounds progress to the Match-Play competition.

In the event of a tie or ties for places in the Match-Play draw, these will be broken as per Part 6 of the General Terms of Competition.

A seeded draw, in accordance with the Official Guide to the Rules of Golf Part lll Section 5F, will be made for the Match-Play element. These matches must be played on or before the laid down “play by” dates during February and March.

All rounds in the Stroke-Play element and all matches in the Match-Play element are played off the yellow tees.

The competition is played under the “Preferred Lies” Local Rule, which, for the purposes of this competition, is extended to cover a players ball lying anywhere in the General Area. 

Once the competition has commenced, no substitution of players is permitted.

The winners of the Winter League competition have their name engraved on the perpetual trophy and the Club honours board, as well as receiving a trophy and/or voucher prize on Presentation Evening. The runners-up also receive a trophy and/or voucher prize.

 

Clarke Bowl

This trophy is awarded to the player who achieves the highest percentage reduction in handicap during the year. There is no entry fee.

The winner of the Clarke Bowl has his name engraved on the perpetual trophy as well as receiving a trophy and/or voucher prize on Presentation Evening. 

 

SPECIFIC TERMS OF COMPETITION (SENIORS)

Winter League

Played between September and March off the yellow tees / mats.

This is a Four-ball Stroke-Play going into Match-Play competition. The Stroke-play round/s are played in early September. The round robin (League) matches are played on mutually agreed dates from the date of the draw until the end of November. The semi-final to be played by mid March and final matches by the end of March and played on mutually agreed dates.

The Stroke-play element consists of two qualifying rounds of Stableford played in early September, with the highest of the two scores to count. This score will be used to establish seedings and to make a cut, if deemed necessary. The field, for this element, is divided into two handicap divisions, (high and low) based on the number of entrants.

Players are seeded based on their Stableford scores and made up into pairs with the winners of each division seeded one and the runners up seeded two etc.

The pairs are then seeded into two equivalent sized leagues (see Official Guide to the Rules of Golf, Committee Procedures Part lll, Section 5F).

Matches in each league are played on a Round Robin basis, i.e. each pair plays every other pair once. Matches finish at the 18th hole with points being awarded as follows: 2 for a win, 1 for a half and 0 for a loss.

Should a pair default on any round they shall be disqualified from further rounds and any matches already played shall be annulled.

Points are totalled at the end to establish the winner and runner up in each league. In the event of a tie, the result of the match between the tied teams shall determine the winner. If the tie is not broken, it shall be decided by lot.

The winners and runners up in the two leagues are then seeded into a knock - out draw in which the rounds will be extended, if necessary, to establish the final placings.

Captain’s Day

Played on a date chosen by the Captain, usually in August.

The Captain will choose the format and conditions of the competition, which is usually a little unusual.

Club Championship (Senior Winner)

See Club Championships under Specific Terms of Competition.

Senior Championship

Played on two consecutive Wednesdays in early September off the white tees.

This is a 36 hole Individual Stroke-Play competition, played over two rounds of 18 holes. The winner is the player who achieves the lowest total gross score over the 36 holes.

For the purposes of net prizes, the field is split into two divisions (high and low handicap).

In the event of a tie (for the overall first place only) there will be a playoff to decide the winner. (See Club Championships for playoff method).

In the event of a tie for net prizes see paragraph 6 of General Terms of Competition.

Veterans Championship

Played on the first Wednesday in October off the yellow tees.

This is an Individual Stroke-Play competition played over 18 holes. The overall winner is the player who achieves the best net score.

In the event of a tie see paragraph 6 of General terms of Competition.

Seniors Summer Knock- Out and Plate (Trophies)

Played over the summer, usually starting in June and ending in September.

This is an Individual Knock-Out Match-Play competition played over 18 holes (extended if necessary to decide a winner), played off the white tees.

A random draw of entrants is conducted for the first round of the Trophy competition, with unmatched players receiving a bye into the second round.

Losers in the first round of the Trophy competition are automatically entered into the Plate competition.

Seniors Spring Knock- Out and Plate

Played during the spring, usually starting in April and ending in June.

This is an Individual Knock-Out Match-Play competition played over 18 holes (extended if necessary to decide a winner), played off the yellow tees.

A random draw of entrants is conducted for the first round of the competition, with unmatched players receiving a bye into the second round.

Losers in the first round of the competition are automatically entered into the Plate competition.

SPECIFIC TERMS OF COMPETITIONS: LADIES

Individual Competitions

Monthly Medal (Stableford format October to March)

Played on the second Saturday of each month. These will be organised by the Committee with Starter and post Competition Presentation including Longest Drive and Nearest the Pin prizes.

(From April to September the competition is played as a medal off the red tees and from October to March as a Stableford off the red tees.)

The player with the best 4 nett aggregate scores will win the Best Nett Club Competition and will qualify for a regional competition.

 

Public Courses Monthly Medal

By paying an additional entry fee on the day of the competition, entrants in the April Monthly Medal are entered into the Public Courses Medal.

The field is divided into divisions as set by the N.A.P.G.C.

Divisional winners qualify to play in the N.A.P.G.C. regional competition, with regional winners progressing to a national final played in September at St Andrews.

 

Muriel Button Medal

A Vets Competition played in conjunction with the July Medal. The best three Nett Scores go forward to the County Association.

 

Tuesday Monthly Medal (Stableford format October to March)

Played on the second Tuesday of the month. These will be organised by the Committee with Starter and post Competition Presentation including Longest Drive and Nearest the Pin prizes.

(From April to September the competition is played as a medal off the red tees and from October to March as a Stableford off the red tees.)

 

Saturday Monthly Stableford

Played on the first Saturday of the Month

The competition can be played at any time on the day with a minimum of two players playing together.

 

Tuesday Monthly Stableford

Played on the first Tuesday of the Month

The competition can be played at any time on the day with a minimum of two players playing together.

 

Millennium Trophy

A Vets Competition played in conjunction with the May Tuesday Stableford. The best scores go forward to the County Association.

 

Summer Knockout and Plate Trophies

An Individual, knock-out, Match-Play competition, played over 18 holes (which will be extended, if necessary, to decide a winner), played off the red tees.

Losers in the first round are automatically entered into the plate competition.

The draw for the first round will be a random draw done in accordance with the Official Guide to the Rules of Golf, Committee Procedures Part lll Section 5F.

Prizes awarded at Club Presentation Evening

Subsequent rounds are played by mutual arrangement on or before laid down “play by” dates, and cannot be played in conjunction with another competition.

 

Mercia Castle Competition

Played in August in conjunction with the medal competition.  The best score goes forward to the County Association.

 

Presidents Day

Played on the first Saturday of August

This is a non-qualifying competition, played off 90% of playing handicap and is open to men and ladies.

It is an 18 hole Individual Stableford competition with men playing off the white tees and ladies off the red tees.

Prize awarded at Club Presentation Evening

 

Ladies Championship

A 36 hole competition played over the first weekend in September following the August Bank Holiday; 18 holes on Saturday and 18 holes on Sunday. The competition will be played in handicap order for the first round. The second round will be played in reverse order based on the results from the first round. There is Gross Champion and a Nett Champion.

Prize awarded at Club Presentation Evening

 

Medal Shoot Out

Played on a Saturday early in October.

All lady members who have won an overall Monthly Medal and/or the Ladies Championship during the year qualify for the Shoot-Out. Prize awarded at Club Presentation Evening

 

Winter League

An individual Stableford Competition played on either Saturday or Sunday of the last weekend of the month between October and March. (December – third weekend to avoid Christmas). The three best three scores are aggregated to establish the winner.

Prize awarded at Club Presentation Evening

 

Winter Eclectic

Individual scores from all competitions are aggregated between October and March.

Prize awarded at Club Presentation Evening

 

9 hole Qualifier Competitions

Played on the last Wednesday of the month between April and September.

 

Team Competitions

 

Memorial Day

A Four-ball Better-ball Stableford competition played over 18 holes off the red tees (mats) on a Saturday in mid –March. Prize awarded at Club Presentation Evening.

 

Daily Mail Foursomes

A Foursomes Stableford competition, played over 18 holes, off the red tees in January. The winners represent Rodway Hill GC in the national competition.

 

County Foursomes

A Foursomes Stableford competition, played over 18 holes, off the red tees in March. The winners represent Rodway Hill GC in the County competition.

 

Australian Spoons

Stableford Foursomes - Handicaps 15 – 40. The winners qualify for a Regional Final played in June.

 

Coronation Foursomes

Maximum handicap 36. Foursomes competition where winners qualify for Area Finals if in top 100 differential scores.

 

PING Fourball BetterBall

A qualifying competition will be organised and the winners go through to the National Competition they may qualify for either the Grand Final (top 52 in the Country) or the Plate Final (next 52) to be played on the first Monday or Tuesday in September.

 

Mixed Competitions

 

Summer Pairs

A Greensomes, knockout Match-Play competition, played over 18 holes (extended to decide a winner).

The competition is open to all men, senior and lady members entered as a pair.

Handicaps are calculated as 0.6 of the lower player’s handicap plus 0.4 of the higher player.

Men play off the white tees and ladies play off the red tees.

A random draw is made for the first round. This and subsequent rounds are played by mutual arrangement on or before laid down “play by” dates.

 

Longest Day

Played on the Saturday nearest to the longest day of the year.

This is a Texas Scramble played by teams of three players.

The team handicap is calculated as 0.1 of the combined handicaps of the three players.

A minimum of four tee shots of each team member must be used during the round.

Prize awarded at Club Presentation Evening

 

Jim Brady Cup

Played on a Saturday at the end of July.

This competition is open to men and ladies.

It is an 18 hole Aggregate Pairs, Stableford competition, with men playing off the white tees and ladies off the red tees.

Prize awarded at Club Presentation Evening

 

Sioux Hatcher Trophy

A mixed competition of teams of one lady and two men with the best two Stableford scores to count.

Prize awarded at the Presentation Evening

 

Other Competitions

Lady Captain’s Day

Played on a date chosen by the Lady Captain who will choose the format and conditions of the competition.

 

Club Captain’s Day

Played on a date chosen by the Captain, usually in August.

The Captain will choose the format and conditions of the competition, and prizes are presented on the day.

          


 

WHAT ARE THE DIFFERENT FORMATS THAT GOLF COMPETITIONS ARE PLAYED IN?

 

There are two main types of golf competitions, Match Play and Stroke Play:

Match Play

In match play, two players (or two teams) play every hole as a separate contest against each other. The party with the lowest nett score wins that hole, or if the scores of both players or teams are equal the hole is “halved” (drawn). The game is won by that party that wins more holes than the other.

Our Club Knock-out competitions are match play events. You do not need a scorecard for match play, but using one helps to keep track of the state of play as well as making sure players know where they get shots.

In Single match play, the lower handicap player gets no shots, and the higher handicap player subtracts the lower player’s handicap from his to determine how many shots he gets. The competition rules may set a maximum handicap limit and may set a handicap allowance e.g. 90%, in which case the handicap difference is multiplied by the allowance. i.e. player A is 10 handicap, player B is 24 handicap, difference is 14, 90% of difference is 12.6 which is rounded up to 13.

In Pairs match play, the lowest handicap player gets no shots, and the other 3 get the difference between the lowest figure and their handicap subject to the conditions above.Pairs match play can also be played as a foursome or greensome, an explanation of these is given under pairs stroke play.

Stroke Play

The majority of club competitions are stroke play competitions. In them you are playing against the course and all the competitors or teams on the day who have entered the competition.There are two main types of Stroke Play, Medal and Stableford, which can both be played as individuals, pairs or teams.

Medal Play: The marker will mark your gross scores down column A of the scorecard and can keep a check on his own scores using the Marker’s column. At the end of the round you must check that the gross scores are correct on your card, sign it and ensure your marker does.  The card should then be placed in the box provided. The lowest gross scores on the day win the prizes, these are usually organised into three divisions by handicap.

Stableford: In competitions the prizes are determined on a points basis. Two points are awarded for a nett par on a hole, 1 for a nett bogey (1 over par), 3 for a nett birdie (1 under par), 4 for a nett 3 under par etc. The marker, as before, enters the gross score in column A. He should then enter the nett score for that hole in the Nett Score column, and the stableford points in the last column. The card should then be signed as above. The highest points scores win the prizes.

A third type of individual stroke play is a bogey (or par) competition. Your gross and nett scores are recorded as for a stableford competition, but instead of points you simply get a plus for a nett score better than par, a minus for a nett score worse than par and a zero for a nett par. These are recorded in the last column and totalled at the bottom.

Pairs Stroke Play

If the competition to be played is a pairs competition, one partner’s name is entered on the card as player A and one as player B. Usually you go out as a fourball, i.e. 2 teams of two, with one card per team. You exchange cards and mark the other pair’s card.

These are the main types of pairs stroke play:

1) Betterball: (Rules 30 and 31). In a betterball competition both partners play their own ball at each hole. The better net score of the partners count on each hole. The gross score is entered either in column A or column B, according to who had the better score, and his net score entered under “Net Score”. If the competition is a stableford then the points are entered in the final column.

2) Foursome: (Rule 29). In a foursome competition each pair has only one ball and players alternate playing it. If player A tees off at the first hole, player B will play the second shot, A the third and so on until the hole is finished. On the second hole, B will tee off (regardless who played the last putt on the first hole), then A does the second shot and so on. Thus one partner always tees off on the odd holes and the other on the even holes. Adding their handicaps together and using the handicap reduction in the competition rules determine the number of strokes the pair receives. The competition may be medal play or stableford. (Match play can also be played as a foursome). Gross, net and points are recorded as before. The gross may be entered entirely in column A, or use A and B to show whose drive was used.

3) Greensome: A greensome is a type of foursome in which each partner hits a tee shot and the pair then chooses which drive to use, and his partner then plays the second shot using this drive. They then alternate as before. This is repeated at each hole.

4)  Aggregate medal or aggregate stableford competition. Here, both players play as if they are in a singles competition, except the marker will score both players on the same card, one in column A and one in column B, and, in a stableford competition, the combined points in the last column. At the end, either the stableford points are added up or, in the case of a medal, the two nett scores added together.

Team Competitions

There are two main types of team competitions:

1) 2 from 4: In a two from four competition, four players play together as a team. The players names are entered on the card as players A, B, C & D and their gross scores entered in the respective columns. The final two columns are for the team nett score and points on each hole. All four players play each hole individually, but only the 2 best nett scores count. At the end of the competition, 2 players from the team sign the card.

2) Texas Scramble: In A Texas Scramble each player in a team tees off on each hole and the players decide which shot was best. Every player then plays his second shot from that spot and the procedure is repeated until the hole is finished. The competition rules will stipulate the handicap allowance of the team, which is usually a percentage of the sum of the handicaps of the team. The rules usually also require that each team members drives are used on a minimum number of holes. In this case, the team score is entered in the column of the player whose drive is used.

RODWAY HILL GOLF CLUB     ANNUAL INCOME AND EXPENDITURE 2019 (1/1/19 – 31/12/19)

INCOME

 

2019 INCOME 2018 INCOME

EXPENDITURE

2019 EXPENDITURE 2018 EXPENDITURE
MEMBERSHIP 7525 6840 AFFILIATIONS 5215 4235
CLOTHING ETC 330   CLOTHING ETC 786 397
CLUB EVENTS 18   INSURANCE 105 105
      ADMIN COSTS 810 372
      CLUB EVENTS 208  
      CLUB CAPTAINS 405  
      MEMBER EXPENSES 0 48
      CLUB SOCIALS 0 695
      CLUB REPRESENTATION 396 105
      DONATIONS 0 225
      CAPITAL EXPENDITURE 720 420
OTHER INCOME   1823 SUNDRIES   508
COMPETITIONS 4471 4161 COMPETITIONS 3915 4937
MEDALS (GROSS) 1584 3281 MEDALS 1182  
TROPHIES 1401 TROPHIES 1151  
SENIORS 339 337 SENIORS 200  
LADIES 1078 543 LADIES 819  
OTHER 69   PRESENTATION NIGHT 559  
SUB TOTAL 12344 12824 SUB TOTAL 12560  
CHARITY 5565   CHARITY 3114  
SENIORS ACTIVITIES 2364   SENIORS ACTIVITIES 2364  
TOTAL 20273 12824 TOTAL 18038 12047
SURPLUS/(DEFICIT) OF INCOME OVER EXPENDITURE       2235 777
BANK BALANCE AT 1 JANUARY 2019       13738 13738
BANK BALANCE AT 31 DECEMBER 2019       15973  

      

NOTES ON THE ACCOUNTS FOR 2019

Introduction

There have been some challenges in completing the accounts for 2019, resulting from the closure of the NatWest account, the opening of a new account with Lloyds and the winding-up of the company.

In addition, the Treasurer and Committee are now able to present the accounts in a way that better demonstrates to members how their money has been spent. This is achieved by showing the accounts in four sections:

  1. Income from subscriptions and other sources and spending against that income – chiefly affiliation fees.
  2. Income from competition entries and spending on prizes and related items, such as signwriting for the honours boards.
  3. Charity income
  4. Seniors activities – the Club account is used as a holding account for these activities (away trip/s and Christmas dinner) so the income and expenditure must balance.

Further, by providing a sub-total below items 1 and 2, members can better see how their subscriptions have been spent.

Notes on income

  1. Membership was up this year – to 214, our highest for a number of years – providing additional income.
  2. Clothing – the Committee decided to subsidise team shirts for the Men’s and Seniors teams, taking an income of only £10 per person, totalling £330.
  3. Competition income – in 2018, Ladies’ income was shown as a net rather than gross figure.

Notes on expenditure

  1. Affiliation fees – this expenditure also includes 6 refunds of memberships, five of which were double paid and one to a leaving member. Affiliation fees amount to £9 per member for England Golf and £13.55 (Men) or £11.50 (Ladies) to Gloucestershire Golf Union, leaving around £12.50 per member for all other Club related expenditure. Taking out Life Members, this provides almost exactly £2500 of income.
  2. Clothing – this line shows that the members’ subscriptions subsidised the team shirts to £556 - £17 per player who purchased a shirt.
  3. Club events/socials – in 2018, the costs of refreshments at the AGM and Presentation Night were shown as Socials; in 2019, the AGM is shown as a CLUB EVENT and presentation night costs are included under that heading.
  4. Admin costs include all aspects of club expenditure and are higher this year as they include a day of training on ‘How Did I Do?’ (£372).
  5. Capital costs include the purchase and erection of the starters’ hut (£533) and of seniors’ blazer badges to cover the next eight years (£186).
  6. The competition costs in 2018 included the purchase of medals for the next ten years. The income from competitions covered all the costs of prizes, vouchers and trophies, the signwriting of the honours boards and refreshments on Presentation Night.
  7. Charity - £3000 was donated to Hope to Tomorrow (Leo Lucas’ charity) and £114 to the British Legion. Just under £3000 is currently held for the current Captains’ charity, the Multiple Sclerosis Society.

Notes on balances

  1. While the bank balances show an excess of income over expenditure, this is explained by the current holding of funds for the Captains’ charity. Comparison of the sub-total figures shows that expenditure this year exceeded income from subscriptions and competition entries by £216, reducing the Club’s carry forward to a little under £13000.

R.W.Wolfson

Treasurer

2 January 2020


·   

We are not currently using this section.  Please refer to the main 'Club News' page.

 

 

 Screen_Shot_2020-03-26_at_10.18.23.png

RODWAY HILL GOLF CLUB COMMITTEE 2020-2021

 

Position Name Contact details Club Committee membership

Club Captain

Richard Grieve

07849936798

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Handicaps and Competitions Committee
Club Vice-Captain Simon Berry

01452535457

07795105950

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Handicaps and Competitions Committee
Ladies Captain Ruth Onions

01452 619817

07490152620

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 
Seniors Captain Dave Matthews

01242 676611

077769577796

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

County Representative

Appeals Committee

Club Secretary Bob Perry

01452506182

07484206230

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 
Handicaps and Competitions Secretary Steve Yemm

01594368043

07904548301

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Handicaps and Competitions Committee (chair)
Membership Secretary Sean Bailey

01452551538

07800764086

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Discipline Committee
Treasurer Bob Wolfson

01452790831

07968126625

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Appeals Committee
Club Welfare Bob Preston

01452760668

07752275008

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Discipline Committee
Committee Members Paul Stevens

01452506057

07450914289

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 
  Sefton Hooton

01242680894

07919882471

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Discipline Committee
  Leo Lucas

01452418068

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Handicaps and Competitions Committee
  Ken Roffey

01452849116

07958524818

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 
Members of the Handicaps and Competitions Committee only

Ian Dickie-Clark

Amanda Chong

 

Handicaps and Competitions Committee

Handicaps and Competitions Committee

 

 

RODWAY HILL GOLF CLUB - CODE OF CONDUCT 

Rodway Hill Golf Club is committed to providing an environment that is free from discrimination, harassment and intimidation for members and employees.

Members are advised that an acceptable standard of behaviour is expected in all areas of the Club and Course at all times and that upon payment of membership, all members give their consent to be bound by both the restrictions and penalties which may be imposed, for any breach of the Club’s standards, or serious misconduct, in failing to meet the standards set in this Code of Conduct.

This Code of Conduct has been set by the Committee and adopted as a Permanent Local Rule, as permitted by Rule 1.2b of the Rules of Golf.

ON THE COURSE

All golfers must:

Avoid slow play and apply the principles of Ready Golf by:

  • maintaining the pace of play by keeping up with the group in front. Your place is behind the group in front of you and not ahead of the group behind you.
  • waving through the following group when delayed by for example searching for balls

Adhere to the Rules of Golf, Local Rules and the General and Specific Terms of Competition.

Care for the Course by repairing pitch marks, replacing divots and raking bunkers.

Show respect towards their fellow golfers by not being aggressive, abusive, noisy or misusing equipment, show respect towards employees and officials and be aware that greens staff have priority.

IN THE CLUBHOUSE

Members must be aware that:

Any form of discrimination, harassment or intimidation is regarded as unacceptable behaviour.

The use of foul or abusive language has no place in the clubhouse.

Smoking or the use of e-cigarettes is not permitted within the Club buildings.

Whilst acknowledging that adult “banter” contributes towards creating a healthy atmosphere among members, care should be taken as some members may find it offensive or intimidating.

GENERAL

This Code of Conduct is not intended to create a bureaucratic, regulatory environment, but rather to promote and enhance the values of the Club.

Any member engaging in any behaviour that may be detrimental to the game of golf or Rodway Hill Golf Club, is in breach of the Code of Conduct and should be reported to the Committee. Any reported transgressions shall be scrutinised by the Disciplinary Committee, who may take appropriate disciplinary action.

Club Committee, January 2020.


 

Offers

 

Winter two ball offer with buggies

£40.00

WINTER TWILIGHT OFFER
Nov 1st - March 31st

from 12 noon £10.00 per person

Book a tee time

Gallery

Contact us

Get in contact with us about staying or playing

Thank you for your enquiry we will get back to you as soon as possible

How to find us

  

Rodway Hill Golf Course,
Newent Road,
Highnam,
Gloucestershire,
GL2 8DR

01452 384222